Chamber Chatter & Marlow Happenings

by Debbe Ridley

Chamber Chatter - March 20, 2014

 

Yea! We’ve finally reached the first day of Spring! To kick the season off right, the first Chamber Luncheon of 2014 will happen next Thursday, March 27 at the Marlow Senior Citizens building, 325 W. Main. Tickets are available at a cost of $6 each. You may pick your tickets up from the Chamber office, or from a member of the Chamber Board, or the Marlow Senior Citizens, Inc. Board.

 

While the Luncheon officially starts at noon, takeouts are welcome, beginning at 11:00 a.m. The hamburgers, homemade desserts and all the fixin’s are being cooked by Marlow Senior Citizens, Inc. volunteers. Besides good food and great company, there are several other reasons to attend, including getting caught up on upcoming community activities.

 

And – not to be forgotten – you could be the winner of a great door prize. In this case, the cash door prize is up to a whopping $225! The drawings for the cash door prize will be from a box containing the names of Marlow Chamber members. BUT, you have to be present to win the cash door prize.

 

You’ll also want to remember to mark the date on your calendar for the Marlow Chamber of Commerce Banquet scheduled on Monday, April 28, at 6:30 p.m. The annual Banquet is the Chamber’s big party of the year, and the Chamber Directors have again decided to accept the hospitality of the First Baptist Church, with the Banquet site set at the FBC LIFE Center this year. Tickets are still a bargain at $15 each for a great meal, and a night out with old and new friends.

 

The highlight of the evening, of course, is celebrating living in our community, and congratulating the new Citizen of the Year, Community Improvement Award winner, and Free Enterprise Award winner. As a part of the Banquet planning process, the Awards Committee will have a final meeting soon and wants to give the community one more opportunity to submit suggestions for the various awards to be presented at the April 28 Banquet.

 

The purpose of the Citizen of the Year Award is to give recognition of outstanding civic contributions and leadership in community life. The Community Improvement Award is intended to give recognition to a company or individual who, “through their efforts and capital investment, have made a significant improvement in the appearance of Marlow, and their establishment.”

 

The purpose of The Free Enterprise Award is to give recognition to an individual “who through his or her acts and efforts display adherence to the principles of the American Economic System.” The individual must be a sole proprietor, and have had a successful business operation in Marlow for several years.

 

The Committee continues to ask for input from the community. Please send your suggestions, along with their names, addresses, and phone numbers to the Chamber of Commerce office, 223 W. Main, or e-mail marlowchamber@cableone.net Names should be submitted by Friday, March 28. You may include any information to give the Committee background, or a letter of recommendation if you would like.

 

The award recipients for the year 2012 presented last year were Citizen of the Year, Carolyn Lowe while the Community Improvement Award winners were Jessica and Stephen Garvin - Little Boy Blue. Neal and Valerie Moore - Frontier Feeds were presented the Free Enterprise Award.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - March 13, 2014

 

“Throughout our Nation’s history, American women have led movements for social and economic justice, made groundbreaking scientific discoveries, enriched our culture with stunning works of art and literature, and charted bold directions in our foreign policy. They have served our country with valor, from the battlefields of the Revolutionary War to the deserts of Iraq and mountains of Afghanistan. During Women’s History Month, we recognize the victories, struggles, and stories of the women who have made our country what it is today.” Thus begins President Obama’s March 1, 2014 Women’s History Month proclamation, a long-standing Presidential tradition.

 

One might argue that August might be more appropriately called “Women’s History Month,” because the 19th Amendment, which gives women the right to vote, was signed and ratified August 26, 1920. As proud Oklahomans it’s interesting to note that women in our state had been voting for more than a year by that time.

 

The vote for women, even in Oklahoma, didn’t come easily though, as evidenced by this article in the October 11, 1907 Marlow Review. “WOMEN SUFFRAGE NOTES. The beginning of modern democracy was when King John was forced by the wealthy barons of his kingdom to give them a share in his power or they would no longer pay taxes upon their vast estates to furnish him with money to carry on the English wars. The masses of the people at first were not permitted the power of the ballot, the king and the barons ruled the people.”

 

“Later the barons were forced to divide their power with the smaller nobility and still later the rich merchants were included and England was ruled by an aristocracy of wealth. In the beginning of the colonies in this country only tax payers could vote and even after the revolutionary war although it was called a republic it was really an aristocracy of money for still only the taxpayer could vote. After a while a great movement arose, owing to the broad views of human liberty held by our American statesmen.”

 

“They said ‘Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed.’ In the course of time the right of suffrage was granted all white men and we had an aristocracy of color. The white man ruled the black man. Finally the black man was given the ballot and we can all remember it was extended to the Indian, until gradually there has come practically universal suffrage for men in the United States.”

 

“Why were women not included in this gradual granting of political freedom? At first she was not a tax payer. When a woman married, and there were few unmarried in that time, all her possessions, even her clothes, became the property of her husband. He was the tax payer.”

 

An article in the August 30, 1907 Marlow Review, sets out a resolution endorsing women suffrage which was passed by the Fourth Annual Convention of the Oklahoma Federation of Labor on August 14 and 15, 1907. “Resolved: that the best interests of labor require the admission of women to full citizenship as a matter of justice to them, and as a necessary step toward insuring the scale of wages for all.”

 

“Therefore, be it resolved by the Twin Territorial Federation of Labor of Oklahoma and Indian Territory that we pledge our efforts to secure suffrage for the women of the new State of Oklahoma.” The article, written by Kate H. Biggers, President of the Women’s Suffrage Association of Oklahoma, concludes, “The members of the Federation of Labor know the value of the ballet for laboring men and want their wives and daughter to have the same protection which it gives them.”

 

The final line of the 2014 Presidential Proclamation invites “all Americans to visit www.WomensHistoryMonth.gov to learn more about the generations of women who have left enduring imprints on our history.” We’d like to extend that same invitation to you!

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - March 6, 2014

 

No doubt you read about the recent dedication at the State Capitol of the portrait of the late Pearl Carter Scott. The portrait of “our Pearl” is the 147th work of art commissioned by the Oklahoma Senate Historical Preservation Fund founded by retired Senator Charles Fort of Tulsa. The portrait, painted by Oklahoma artist Christopher Nick, was a gift of the Chickasaw Nation, Governor Bill Anoatubby and Rep. Ray McCarter, Ed.D.

 

The official reception brochure reminds us that Eula Pearl Carter Scott was born on December 9, 1915 in Marlow to father, George, and mother, Lucy, who was an original enrollee of the Chickasaw Nation. “After learning how to drive at the age of 12, she soared to new heights and learned to fly at the age of 13 under legendary aviator Wiley Post.

 

Why would Eula Pearl Carter Scott be honored in this extraordinary way by the State of Oklahoma? Because she was really something – that’s why.

 

Let’s crawl in our time machine – the September 18, 1930 issue of The Marlow Review – and take a look. “MARLOW GIRL, 14, IN SOLO FLIGHT. Eula Pearl Carter Takes Up Cabin Ship from Airport Here; May be Youngest U. S. Aviatrix. Handling the controls like a seasoned transport pilot, Eula Pearl Carter, 14 year old Marlow high school sophomore, swooped into the air in her father’s Curtiss-Robin cabin monoplane at Carter Airport last Friday to become possibly the youngest aviatrix in the United States.”

 

“Early in the week, the youthful flyer had accumulated two hours and 30 minutes of solo flying time in a number of trips into the air. Eula Pearl, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Carter, has long been interested in aviation, making many flights with her father and his various pilots before taking up instruction herself. Last April 4 she took her first lesson in flying. Since that time she has been under the instruction of R. H. Marshall, who has nearly 1,800 flying hours. Often, before making her initial flight alone, she had piloted the ship with Marshall acting solely as a passenger.”

 

“It was 7:45 last Friday morning, however, that Eula Pearl made the big step toward becoming a licensed pilot, when she took the monoplane neatly into the air. In one of her solo flights since then, she reached an altitude of 2,000 feet. In addition to being an aviatrix, Eula Pearl won the county Junior High violin solo contests three years in a row and is now learning saxophone.”

 

What was the big deal about Pearl learning to fly? It was all the DOORS that it opened. Take a look – February 5, 1931 Marlow Review: “Marlow Plane Helps Greet Will Rogers. George Carter’s Curtiss-Robin monoplane was one of the four county planes that flew six miles east of Duncan Wednesday morning to meet and escort the plane carrying Will Rogers, noted humorist, to Duncan. Mr. Carter’s plane was piloted by his daughter, Miss Eula Pearl Carter. “Slim” Marshall, Mr. Carter’s pilot, was with Miss Carter in the plane.”

 

“Other airplanes that went to meet Rogers were Dr. A. J. Weedn’s plane, and two owned by Erle P. Halliburton, Duncan Capitalist. After the Will Rogers program in Duncan, Miss Carter flew her father’s plane to Lawton in company with the plane in which Mr. Rogers was traveling.”

 

Young Eula Pearl could have never dreamed that almost 84 years into the future, her portrait would be included in the paintings displayed on the walls of our capitol’s gallery. Just a little girl from Marlow. Imagine that.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - February 27, 2014 

 

While the 2014 Marlow Chamber of Commerce Banquet is scheduled for Monday, April 28,a committee will soon be appointed to select the Citizen of the Year, The Community Improvement Award and The Free Enterprise Award. The purpose of the Citizen of the Year Award is to give recognition of their outstanding civic contributions and leadership in community life.

 

The Community Improvement Award is intended to give recognition to a company or individual who, through their efforts and capital investment have made a significant improvement in the appearance of Marlow, and their establishment. The purpose of The Free Enterprise Award is to give recognition to an individual who through his or her acts and efforts display adherence to the principles of the American Economic System. The individual shall be a sole proprietor, and have had a successful business operation in Marlow for several years.

 

We’d like to take one more opportunity to congratulate the winners for the year 2012 which were presented at the April 29, 2013 Chamber Banquet. It was a pleasure for everyone to give applause to the 2012 Citizen of the Year, Carolyn Lowe. The Chamber of Commerce also recognized Jessica and Stephen Garvin – Little Boy Blue – with the 2012 Community Improvement Award, and Neal and Valerie Moore – Frontier Feeds – as recipients of the 2012 Free Enterprise Award.

 

The Committee would like your input. Please return your suggestions to the office, 223 W. Main, or to marlowchamber@cableone.net . You may make more than one suggestion in each category if you wish.

 

In more Chamber business, Marlow Chamber of Commerce officials are looking for a hostess or host for the Marlow Area Museum. Employment in the Museum is funded through the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) administered through ASCOG. This program requires participants be 55 years of age or older, meet certain income guidelines, and that they work 20 hours per week. For more information, just give the Chamber of Commerce office a call at 658-2212.

 

You may have noticed that the destination of the “Time Traveling with the Chamber” series in The Marlow Review so far this year is 1914. It’s always a challenge to land in a year that might be of interest to the reader, but it seemed fitting to use this time machine to step back exactly 100 years into Marlow’s past.

 

What were some of the notable events of the year? 1914 marked the beginning of “The Great War.” Congress passed the Revenue Act mandating the first tax on incomes over $3,000. The Panama Canal was finally opened, after taking multiple countries a total of 34 years to build, and costing over 27,000 workers their lives.

 

As you know today’s minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. In 1914 Henry Ford raised minimum daily pay from $2.34 to $5 for qualifying workers. The unemployment rate was 7.9%, and the cost of a first-class stamp was $0.02. On the lighter side of everyday life, in his second big-screen appearance Charlie Chaplin played the Little Tramp, his most famous character. Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes was published in 1914.

 

Tarzan trivia anyone? According to themoviedb.org, the first Tarzan movie was a silent one, filmed in 1918. More than 80 Tarzan movies have been produced since then.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - February 20, 2014

 

We’ve been given the gift of the recent series of articles in The Marlow Review refreshing the tale of the Marlow family for many of us. For many new “Marlow Outlaws” the articles give them a look into Marlow’s past and why we ARE Marlow and ARE the Outlaws. It seems timely to share a look back at that time from first hand accounts of an early day Marlow settler through the records of the Indian Pioneer project.

 

Interview with Ed Adkins, May 17, 1937: Mr. Ed Askins, Marlow, Oklahoma, was born in Wise County, Texas in the year of 1861.

 

“I came into Oklahoma in 1886 over the old Chisholm Trail with the Wade boys up to Marlow Cabin. Well, in fact the Wades bought the Marlow boys out.” “Bill and Tom built a ranch house out of Burr Oak logs just three miles north of the site of Marlow City. They ran cattle on both sides of the creek over in the Comanche country too. They ran their cattle back across the line though several times. They wanted the $1.00 a head for grazing the cattle.” “Their brand was the boot brand and the ranch was called the Rod Ranch. Now, I did quite a bit of buying and in doing this I had several running brands. I branded the L & L and the O.T. I used the 77 bar brand for horses. I was about the only man who ran a separate brand for horses.”

 

“People talk of the Marlow outlaws, but I don’t think they were any tougher than most men at that time. You know they would stampede trail herds when they stopped at the camp for water. When the herds would be gone they would pick up the strays that were left behind and when rewards were offered for strays or stolen cattle the boys would get in touch with the person offering the reward, then they would go to their pen and pick the cattle out and return them for the reward. That is the way they made their money. Their place was near Beasley and there was more in the ring than just the Marlow boys.” “As you know there were no fences at that time. I had a bunch of cattle taking them to the Cheyenne country to graze. I must have had about 650 head in the bunch. I got over near the Agency when Old Baldwin stopped me and told me I would have to pay for trespassing on the reservation. He wanted to know how many head I had. I told him 321. He said if I had any more than that he was going to make me pay for the extras besides throwing me in jail. He said he was coming out the next morning to count them. I rushed out to my bunch and told them what Baldwin had said. We got busy and drove our bunch over into the Cheyenne that night. I knew I was in for it if he did come out and make the count.” Sounds like Mr. Askins might have been operating a bit on the shady side himself!

 

Life in the Indian Territory of the late 1880s was definitely not for the timid or faint of heart! We have this peek into the past through a Federal Works Project, the Indian-Pioneer Papers. This oral history collection touches on histories from 1861 to 1936, and includes typescripts of interviews conducted during the 1930's by government workers with thousands of Oklahomans. The repository is the “Western History Collection, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma.” 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter – February 13, 2014

 

Many of all ages look forward to spending time with loved ones on Valentine’s Day. There are some interesting numbers shared last week in an article by the National Retail Federation. While not exactly focusing on the romantic side of the day, the numbers show the impact of the holiday from a retail establishment point of view.

 

In the article, according to the National Retail Federation’s 2014 Valentine’s Day spending survey conducted by Prosper Insights and Analytics, 54 percent of Americans will celebrate with their loved ones this year, compared to 60 percent in 2013. The average person plans to spend $133.91 on candy, cards, gifts, dinner and more, up slightly from $130.97 last year. Total spending is expected to reach $17.3 billion. ”This is the one day of the year when millions find a way to show their loved ones they care,” NRF President and CEO Matthew Shay is quoted as saying. He also said “Consumers can expect Cupid’s holiday to resemble the promotional holiday season we saw just a few months ago, as retailers recognize that their customers are still looking for the biggest bang for their buck.’”

 

According the the NRF, “Gift-givers will find the perfect gift for their loved ones that fits their budget, whether it’s candy, flowers, jewelry, clothing, an evening out or simply a greeting card. Nearly half (48.7%) will buy candy, a third will give flowers (37.3%) and over half (51.2%) will send greeting cards. Nineteen percent will treat their significant other to something sparkly – jewelry spending will total $3.9 billion, and 37 percent will celebrate with an evening out, spending an estimated total of $3.5 billion. Others will give more practical gifts like clothing (15.8%) or gift cards (14%) so their loved ones can have that item they’ve been eyeing in the store.” We also learn from the NRF that men will spend $108.38 on gifts for their significant others – twice as much as women who will spend $49.41 on their special someone. People will also show their appreciation for family members (59.4%) friends (21.7%) teachers (20.4%) and colleagues (12.1%).

 

Valentine’s Day is not just a people-holiday. 19.4 percent will buy gifts for their furry friends, spending an average of $5.51.” We also found out over at facts.randomhistory.com that approximately one billion Valentine cards are sent each year around the world, compared to an estimated 2.6 billion cards sent during the Christmas holidays. As for those cheery little hearts we’ve seen all of our lives – the peak selling season for conversation hearts lasts only six weeks, but confectioners produce the candy for nearly eleven months of the year. And you might be surprised to learn that at least ten new conversation heart sayings are introduced each year! And by the way – if you find some on sale this weekend, we also found out they have a shelf life of five years! Happy Valentine’s Day to all!

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - February 6, 2014

 

If you like people, have an interest in Marlow, and the recent Marlow Review series of articles about the Marlow family has whetted your appetite to learn more about Marlow’s history, you might be just the person we are looking for! Marlow Chamber of Commerce officials are seeking a new hostess or host for the Marlow Area Museum. Employment in the Museum is funded through the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) administered through ASCOG. This program requires participants be 55 years of age or older, meet certain income guidelines, and that they work 20 hours per week. For more information, just give the Chamber of Commerce office a call at 658-2212.

 

Looking around at this week’s wintery landscape, it comes to mind that it wasn’t so long ago that ice and snow and blizzards could much more life threatening than they are for most of us these days — under ordinary conditions that is. We can learn first hand how “our boys” dealt with blizzard conditions in a passage from Life of the Marlows - A True Story of Frontier Life of Early Days. You will recall, this book was originally written by William Rathmell with the cooperation of George and Charley Marlow, and published in 1892. Chapter VI tells the story. “While still out on the hunt mentioned in the preceding chapter, and three or four days after the terrible experience with the wolves, the memorable blizzard that swept that section of the country with its wintry blasts in ‘87 came upon them and caught them far from home and entirely shelterless. Many settlers and hundreds of head of stock froze to death in that terrible storm, and every living creature suffered from the chilling blasts of its icy breath.”

 

“Our little hunting party tied all the blankets they had in camp over the shivering forms of their horses and then turned them loose, while for themselves they dug a deep pit and stretched a wagon cover over it. During the night they worked incessantly to keep a roaring fire in one end of their hole in the ground, and this they were enabled to do because of having over two hundred pounds of buffalo tallow to feed its flames.” “It was a dark and terrible night, and one which will remain in the history [memory?] of its survivors as long as they live. When those mighty blizzards of snow are blown over the great tracts of level and unprotected prairie lands in howling hurricanes that freeze and blight everything in its path, it is an occasion of horror, suffering and death.”

 

In the 2004 edited, and annotated version of the book, released by Robert K. DeArment, who is described as “a noted historian of outlaws and lawmen of the West,” he clarifies the blizzard referred to in the original book. His footnote tells us: “The most memorable blizzard to strike the south plains during the decade of the ‘80s was a killer storm that swept down out of the north in January 1886, with sub-zero temperatures, high winds and heavy snowfall.” “Range cattle died by the tens of thousands and a number of humans, caught away from shelter, froze to death or lost limbs. The winter of 1887 was also severe but the ‘memorable blizzard’ in that country was the ‘Great White Ruin’ of the previous January (Sandoz, The Cattlemen, 258-67.”

 

Interested in learning more? Want to get out and about a few hours a week? The position of Museum host or hostess might be for you! Just give the office a call (658-2212) for more information.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - January 30, 2014 

 

If you read this column last week and the various quotes from the 1910 Marlow Review, you might have jumped to the conclusion that the sidewalks referred to in 1910 were those removed as a part of the 2013-2014 new sidewalk project.  Not so fast. 

 

You thought WE waited a long time to get new sidewalks?  Take a look at this.  Fast forward ten years to the year 1920.

 

From the February 12, 1920 Marlow Review: “MANY SIDEWALKS ARE TO BE BUILT.  City Council is Mapping out District and Will Order Walks Constructed at Next Session.  The Review is reliably informed that the City Council will at the next meeting night order down a number of miles of concrete sidewalks in the main business and resident districts of the City.  A committee of councilmen have been busy the past several days mapping out the district and will possibility have it before the council at the adjourned session tonight.”

 

“The sidewalk question has been up  for discussion many times in the past but never before did we have a body of City lawmakers who had the stamina to stand for the needed civic improvements and to keep at the task until the improvement program was completed.”

 

“The present City administration, in the opinion of many will go down in the history of the town as being the most practical, progressive and aggressive the town has ever known.  When the editor of this newspaper was working for the election of these men, he felt then that the voters were making a wise selection.  Marlow has all natural advantages if property exploited.  But this much is certain, civic improvements are just as vital to the growth of the town as private and business advancements.”

 

“In taking the lead for street paving and sidewalks, the council has the backing of every progressive citizen of Marlow.  No one opposed the street paving, although there are possibly a few who did not want the additional expense of securing it.  Everyone now wants sidewalks and are just as enthusiastic about the matter, and possibly more so than were those who favored paving.  The expense of building sidewalks is very very much less than paving and while it hits almost every property owner in the down town section, it will add more value to the real estate holdings.”

 

The 1920 Marlow Review editor and owner, James C. Nance, concludes the article by offering local citizens a way to opt out of the additional sidewalk expense.

 

 “Marlow is going forward, with bright prospects of being a real little City.  The citizenship almost to a person is working for its advancement, and there is another happy thought about the matter and that is if there should be anyone who does not want the additional expense of improvements, he can dispose of his property and buy further back in the residential section of the City or if he so wishes he can move to some cross roads village where such things will never be a reality.”

 

Mr. Nance — Back in 1920, why didn’t you tell them what you REALLY thought!

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - January 9, 2014

 

Some friends were recently entertaining guests from out of town, and part of that entertainment was a viewing of Pearl  – the story of one of Marlow’s quite remarkable citizens.

 

Everyone may have  heard about Pearl the movie, a production of the Chickasaw Nation and Media 13,or even seen it at various venues.  If so, you know the movie has now been released in a limited edition special 2-disc set.  At last account the 2-disc set is available for purchase through the incredible facility of  Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur

.

For those who are new to town, or otherwise in the dark,  quoting the DVD set cover, “Set in 1920's rural Oklahoma, Pearl is the inspiring and true story of Chickasaw aviatrix, Pearl Carter Scott, the youngest licenced pilot in American history.”

 

“Mentored by world-renowned aviator Wiley Post, Pearl first pilots a plane at age 12 and becomes and commercial pilot and local barnstorming celebrity before she reaches adulthood.”

 

Disc 1 is the movie, and disc 2 includes deleted scenes, “Just One Dream” music video, the Making of “Pearl,” Cast & Crew Commentary, and “Pearl Carter Scott: On Top of the World Documentary.”

 

Marlow Chamber of Commerce officials worked closely with Joey Landsdale of Chickasaw Multi-Media in gathering information for the documentary portion of the disc, and many of the photos included are on display in the Marlow Area Museum.  In the making for several years, you’ll  see wonderful scenes including Pearl Carter Scott as she remembers her adventures.  .You’ll also find clips of local street scenes from the era, as well as recent interviews with Jack Graves, Bill Renfrow and D. B. Green sharing memories of Pearl Carter Scott. 

 

If you wonder how accurate the movies is, and how accurate Pearl’s own memories were, this articles from the September 18, 1930 Marlow Review will take away any doubts.    “MARLOW GIRL, 14, IN SOLO FLIGHT.  Eula Pearl Carter Takes up Cabin Ship from Airport Here; May be Youngest U. S. Aviatrix.  Handling the controls like a seasoned transport pilot, Eula Pearl Carter, 14 year-old Marlow high school sophomore, swooped into the air in her father’s Curtiss-Robin cabin monoplane, at Carter Airport last Friday to become possibly the youngest aviatrix in the United States.”

 

“Early in the week,, the youthful flyer had accumulated two hours and 30 minutes of solo flying time in a number of trips into the air.”

 

“Eula Pearl, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Carter, has long been interested in aviation, making many flights with her father and his various pilots before taking up instruction herself.  Last April 4 she took her first lesson in flying.  Since that time she has been under the instruction of R. H. Marshall, who has nearly 1,800 flying hours.  Often, before making her initial flight alone, she had piloted the ship with Marshall acting solely as a passenger.”

 

“It was 7:45 last Friday morning however, that Eula Pearl made the big step toward becoming a licensed pilot, when she took the monoplane neatly into the air.  In one of her solo flights since then, she reached an altitude of 2,000 feet.”

 

For more about Pearl the movie take a trip over to www.pearlthemovie.net/press.htm.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Chamber Chatter - January 2, 2014
 

Every time  the calendar is turned over to  another year, it is only natural to reflect on the year in the rear view mirror.  What a year we have had here in our wonderful community!  Giant leaps have been taken to prepare Marlow for a bright future.  Can we even imagine the giant leaps of faith made by our founding fathers as Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory looked forward joining together to form the great state of Oklahoma in 1907?
 
Let’s see what they thought as their future was unfolding.  From the January 4, 1907 Marlow Review: “NINETEEN HUNDRED SIX.  How do you like it?  It hasn’t been all you like?  Has any year of your experience?”
 
“It has been the best year in Marlow’s history.  The greatest degree of improvement has been done that has been accomplished in one year of her history.  Waterworks and electric lights constitute her public improvements.  Five new brick business houses, a commodious opera house, a new eight stand gin, an elevator, some 60 residence houses with fifty residences improved and enlarged are a part of her private or individual improvement.  Improvement in the way of better stocks of goods, some new business concerns and better facilities to perform its duties as a town are improvements also noted.  Only one business failure has been noted, a grocery merchant trying to do too much business on a little capital.”
 
“No disasters or pestilences [sic] have visited the country in or around Marlow, the early freeze in its destruction of cotton being about the only condition much to our detriment.  Marlow has sold goods and purchased farm products over a larger area this year than ever before.  Nineteen hundred six has been a good year.”
 
“NINETEEN HUNDRED SEVEN.  No unfavorable circumstance seems to confront us as we enter the new year, on the contrary everything points to a prosperous year.  The wood reserve will be settled and much new land will be put into cultivation in the Chickasaw side of our territory.  Present conditions do not indicate crop prospects but they are favorable for moisture for early planting and for small grain crops.  Today lumber is being placed for two four-room cottages and one three-room cottage and everything indicates the continued growth of the town and the success of the people generally.  Here’s hoping 1907 will be one of prosperity and happiness.”
 
Did these founding fathers take a breath and rest on their laurels?  No.  Here’s  what a look back at the year held just two years later when we were at last Marlow, Oklahoma.  From the December 31, 1909 Marlow Review: “A YEAR’S PROGRESS.  During the year 1908  there has been expended a larger sum of money on substantial buildings and improvements in Marlow than in any year of her history.  More costly and beautiful residences and more improvements of those already built were added than ever before in an equal period.”
 
“While only three new brick buildings have been built in the business district two have been enlarged to two stories high and two concrete block buildings have been constructed.  We expected  to and should have had a new elevator built – it will be built next year.  We have a new school building for which the town will pay — extras added — about forty thousand dollars.”
 
“We lost the Acme Cement Plaster Co.’s plant but it is now believed they will rebuild very soon and double the capacity of the mill.  It has been a year of progress and ends with the outlook for the future the brightest yet experienced by both town and country population.”
 
Wow!  They make us look like slackers!  We’d better get busy!  Welcome to 2014!

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________